Great Lakes Independent 
Booksellers Association
 


 American
Independent Business Alliance http://www.amiba.net

The American Independent Business Alliance (AMIBA) is a non-profit organization helping communities to launch and successfully operate programs to support community-based enterprise and entrepreneurship, build local wealth and prevent the displacement of independent businesses by major corporations. We provide training and support for local groups to engage in three major realms:

    Implement public education campaigns to highlight the greater overall value local businesses often can provide as well as the vital economic, social and cultural role they play in the community.
    Facilitate cooperative promotion, advertising, purchasing, sharing of skills and resources and other activities to help local businesses gain economies of scale and compete more effectively.
    Create a strong, uncompromised voice for local independent business and sustainable economic development in local government and media while engaging citizens in guiding the future of their community.

Booksellers have played a key role in a growing national movement of Independent Business Alliances – community coalitions that can help you succeed through teaming with other independent businesses, civic groups and concerned citizens in your community.



Here is the link to their most requested article: The Benefits of Doing Business Locally
http://www.amiba.net/assets/files/pdfs/benefits_doing_biz_locally.pdf

AMIBA’s Tips for Starting an Independent Business Alliance in Your Community

1) Get a portfolio / information packet
If you’re not yet familiar with the IBA organizing model, AMIBA produces an information portfolio that makes it easy to show others using examples from IBA around the country. Consider raising the idea with concerned citizens and local officials in addition to other independent business owners.

2) Organize a local presentation
A community presentation and workshop facilitated by AMIBA staff almost always moves interest into action. Local government agencies and universities often will cover the cost of such events (contact AMIBA for suggestions and supporting materials before approaching them).

3) Don't try to sell the invisible
GLBA is subsidizing 60% of the cost of becoming an AMIBA member and gaining a wide range of useful resources. Their starter kit includes templates for Articles of Incorporation, bylaws, a start-up handbook, business plan, database and access to a large and growing number of templates. AMIBA staff with first-hand experience operating IBAs offer ongoing support. Take advantage of this unique GLBA benefit!

4) Organize Your Steering Committee
Many hands make for light work. If each person can take on a few tasks, your IBA will get up and running quickly. Utilize the talents of your initial core group and expand it. Your inaugural board of directors likely will derive its members from this group.

5) Organize your Infrastructure
Energy and idealism without these fundamentals can go only so far. You'll need to set up a database, accounting system, bank account, dues scale, oversight committees. AMIBA templates and how-to's offer step-by-step guidance.

6) Begin Developing Relationships with Local Media and Government.
Media coverage will help you raise dialogue, recruit members, and build credibility and recognition. You can't start a conversation with local government soon enough -- the IBA voice should be represented in local economic development discussion.

BALLE:The Business Alliance for Local Living Economies

BALLE is North America's fastest growing network of socially responsible businesses, comprised of over 80 community networks in 30 U.S. states and Canadian provinces representing over 22,000 independent business members across the U.S. and Canada.

BALLE believes that local, independent businesses are among our most potent change agents, uniquely prepared to take on the challenges of the twenty-first century with an agility, sense of place, and relationship-based approach others lack. They are more than employers and profit-makers; they are neighbors, community builders and the starting point for social innovation, aligning commerce with the common good and bringing transparency, accountability, and a caring human face to the marketplace.

BALLE believes in the power of bottom-up, networked change. In the age of the Internet and social networking and the emergence of “glocalism” as a new form of social consciousness, we believe that never before have communities possessed as much power to determine their futures as they do today and in ways that are good for people, places and the planet.

By catalyzing and connecting local business networks dedicated to Living Economy principles, we are movement builders, growing an ever-expanding constituency for sustainable businesses and sustainable communities, from Main Street to the world.

ILSR: Institute for Local Self Reliance

The Institute’s mission is to provide innovative strategies, working models and timely information to support environmentally sound and equitable community development. To this end, ILSR works with citizens, activists, policymakers and entrepreneurs to design systems, policies and enterprises that meet local or regional needs; to maximize human, material, natural and financial resources; and to ensure that the benefits of these systems and resources accrue to all local citizens.

Since 1974, the Institute for Local Self-Reliance has been working to enable communities with tools to increase economic effectiveness, reduce wastes, decrease environmental impacts and provide for local ownership of the infrastructure and resources essential for community well-being.

The New Rules Project

A program of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, the New Rules Project started back in 1998 and continues to bring fresh new policy solutions to communities and states to ensure that they are "designing rules as if community matters"

The New Rules Projects features a number of policy areas and several key programs and initiatives, including: The Hometown Advantage, Telecommunications as Commons Initiative, Biofuels and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, and Climate Neutral Bonding.

Why New Rules?

Because the old ones don't work any longer. They undermine local economies, subvert democracy, weaken our sense of community, and ignore the costs of our decisions on the next generation.

The Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR) proposes a set of new rules that builds community by supporting humanly scaled politics and economics. The rules call for:

  • Decisions made by those who will feel the impact of those decisions.
  • Communities accepting responsibility for the welfare of their members and for the next generation.
  • Households and communities possessing or owning sufficient productive capacity to generate real wealth.

These are the principles of "new localism." They call upon us to begin viewing our communities and our regions not only as places of residence, recreation and retail but as places that nurture active and informed citizens with the skills and productive capacity to generate real wealth and the authority to govern their own lives.

All human societies are governed by rules. We make the rules and the rules make us. Thus, the heart of this web site is a growing storehouse of community and local economy-building rules - laws, regulations, and ordinances - because these are the concrete expression of our values. They channel entrepreneurial energy and investment capital and scientific genius. The New Rules Project identifies rules that honor a sense of place and prize rootedness, continuity and stability as well as innovation and enterprise.




            Localism Index

Number of new independent bookstores that have opened since 2005: 437
Increase since 2002 in the number of small specialty food stores: 1,414
Increase since 2002 in the number of small farms: 111,839
Number of farmers markets active in 2010: 6,132
Percentage of active farmers markets started since 2000

Average percentage of shoppers at a large supermarket who have a conversation with another customer: 9
Average percentage of shoppers at a farmers market who have a conversation with another customer: 63
Percentage of bank assets held by small and mid-sized community banks: 22
Percentage of small business loans made by small and mid-sized community banks: 54
Growth in deposits at small banks and credit unions since 2008: $77 billion
Number of chain pharmacy locations that opened in 2009: 177
Number of independent pharmacy locations that opened in 2009: 474
Number of Independent Business Alliances and Local First groups in 2005: 30
Number of Independent Business Alliances and Local First groups in 2010: 143

: 53
Average percentage of shoppers at a large supermarket who have a conversation with another customer: 9
Average percentage of shoppers at a farmers market who have a conversation with another customer: 63
Percentage of bank assets held by small and mid-sized community banks: 22
Percentage of small business loans made by small and mid-sized community banks: 54
Growth in deposits at small banks and credit unions since 2008: $77 billion
Number of chain pharmacy locations that opened in 2009: 177
Number of independent pharmacy locations that opened in 2009: 474
Number of Independent Business Alliances and Local First groups in 2005: 30
Number of Independent Business Alliances and Local First groups in 2010: 143
Percentage change in 2010 sales for independent businesses in cities without a Buy Local First initiative: 2.1
Percentage change in 2010 sales for independent businesses in cities with a Buy Local First initiative: 5.6
Increase since 2002 in the number of Starbucks company stores: 3,297
Increase since 2002 in the number of independent coffee shops: 4,923
Average portion of $100 spent at a Target store that stays in the local economy: $16
Average portion of $100 spent at independent retailers that stays in the local economy: $32
Average amount of local wages paid for every $100 spent at a full-service chain restaurant: $18.68
Average amount of local wages paid for every $100 spent at a full-service locally owned restaurant: $28.46
Minimum amount having a grocery store, bookstore, coffee shop and restaurant within half a mile of a house
increases its value: $21,000

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Great Lakes Independent Booksellers Association
2113 Roosevelt, Ypsilanti, MI 48197
 (734) 340-6397
E-mail:
 deb@gliba.org

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